"Coming Home"

Blocking In Phase 1
Mountain Work Phase 2
More Mountain Work Phase 3
"Coming Home"
Building the Frame
Building the Frame

Building the Frame

My client wanted an unusual 18" x 60" size piece for their home, so it was necessary to build it from scratch. 

 

I selected a lovely poplar wood for this frame which was strong enough to withstand warping when the canvas was stretched super tight but wasn't so tough I couldn't work with it.  Measured and cut carefully, spacing and carefully drilling out grooves on the inside of the frame to tightly hold the supports.  This thing was SOLID!

Stretched Canvas
Stretched Canvas

Stretching Canvas

As my friend Michelle once told me, if you aren't getting blisters when you stretch your canvas, you simply are NOT doing it right!  I'm not sure if that holds true for everyone, but I've found that to be a good guide for me in my own canvas-stretching endeavors.

Gesso Time
Gesso Time

Gesso Time

The gesso stage is extremely important to me when I intend to add intricate details...I don't want the texture of the canvas to become my enemy.  I repeat the process of gesso and sanding depending on my medium and subject.  With this piece, I applied three layers of gesso, sanding with super fine sand paper between each layer and at the end of the process.  If I had to do it again, I very well may have repeated it for one more layer, but I'm happy with the result nonetheless.

Blocking In Phase 1
Blocking In Phase 1

Blocking In

Roughly blocked in with acrylic.  At this point, I moved some shrubbery around, but I had every intention of only painting Ragged Mountain and surrounding mountain pastures.

Mountain Work Phase 2
Mountain Work Phase 2

Mountain Work

Beginning to build the structure of the mountains...and working on how to add a touch of life...

More Mountain Work
Detailing Mountains

Detailing Mountains

_Coming Home_
_Coming Home_

"Coming Home"

As I shared progress on this piece with my client, we talked about some of the things that were special about Ragged Mountain and the pioneer style of life she and her husband yearned for.  That lifestyle may be a thing of the past, but I think we captured a bit of that feeling as a means of temporary escape every time they look at this painting on their wall.